Monday 22 June 2015, 8pm

Annelies Monseré + Ute Kanngiesser (solo)

No Longer Available

Annelies Monseré is a Belgian multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter with a compositional style both imaginative and thoughtful. Her debut album “Helder” was released in 2005 on BlueSanct, and since then she ha put out several other albums and EP's as well as collaborating with the likes of Drekka, Jessica Bailiff, In Gowan Ring and Toss. She has performed mesmerizing concerts with the likes of Movietone, Crescent, Hood, Rivulets and Tara Jane O'Neil.

“An exercise in communicating the things in the darkest corners of your skull. Monseré does it magnificently.” – Digitalis industries

“When Monseré plays she allows each note to speak clearly and simply and toys with a childlike naivety which is impossible not to fall in love with.” – Boomkat

Annelies Monseré

Annelies Monseré has been playing music solo since 2000. Initially the music was piano-based and mostly instrumental. Once she 'discovered' her voice, vocals became a main focus. The early songs had very simple structures and melodies, and the words were sparse and introvert. Musically, she experimented with different instruments such as cello, guitar, xylophone and melodica. Her debut album 'Helder' (released byBlueSanct) was described as "a delicate album, complete with beautiful cracks and loads of tape-hiss. [...] an intensely intimate album". Other musicians, such as Wim Lecluyse (Circle Bros.) , Ellen Evers (The Puddle Parade), Jessica Bailiff, Michael Anderson (dREKKa, Turn Pale), Nathan Amundson (rivulets), Justin Vollmar (Vollmar)and Nathan Vollmar (Vollmar) supported her on stage and contributed to her second album 'Marit' (release by Auetic). This gave the album a significantly warmer sound and a less solitary feel than her previous material. Her most recent output is a 7 inch called 'somewhere someone' on Morc Records. This ep features a Hammond organ for the first time. This instrument led to new approaches in songwriting. This release deviates clearly from previous releases, with a darker and harsher sound. Besides her solo materials she is also collaborating with Jessica Bailiff. An EP has been released by Morc Records. For the moment she is working on a third full length, on new music with Jessica Bailiff, and more. 

Ute Kanngiesser

Ute Kanngiesser is a London based in musician from Germany. She has played classical cello since early childhood and turned to improvisation and experimental music while training in physical theatre and dance in Berlin. Since then, she has radically deconstructed her classical roots and focussed on the immediate material of her instrument - its limitless resonance and pulse, its potential for an elemental music that dissolves conventional notions of rhythm and pitch and what it means to be lyrical. Along this journey she has worked with some of the most influential players of free music and experimental composition, as well as artist film makers, writers and architects.

Most recent collaborations have been with John Tilbury, Seymour Wright, Paul Abbott, Billy Steiger, Angharad Davies, Steve Noble, Crystabel Riley, Rie Nakajima, Daniel Blumberg, Jim White, Eddie Prevost, John Butcher, Evie Ward, Tom Wheatley, Jennifer Allum, Marjolaine Charbin, Dimitra Lazaridou Chatzigoga, Keiko Yamamoto, Phil Minton, Pak Yan Lau, Assemble, and Keira Greene.

Her music has been released on Otoroku, Matchless, Earshots, Another Timbre and Mute. www.utekanngiesser.com

Words about Ute Kanngiesser's solo release Geäder (Earshots):

"Automatic writing almost, or a fugue state. Arriving at an end point is an exhaustion, almost like waking from a dream. You look back at what has been created with bafflement. Footprints on a beach you can’t remember. You marvel: what have I done?" – We Need No Swords

"[...] environmental sounds captured in Hackney as a spur for improvisation; nasal bowing sounds, percussive fanfares, unspooling loops of harmonics that crack upon impact – whole sides to the cello normally shut down by conventional technique." - The Guardian