NEW IN THE SHOP

Musicians:  Antonin Gerbal (FR) – drums,  Joel Grip (SW) – double bass,  Pat Thomas (UK) – piano,  Seymour Wright (UK) – alto sax Four of the most idiosyncratic and creative voices at the margins of jazz, imagine their way into and around the music and philosophy of Ahmed Abdul-Malik. This is music to listen, dance and think to. A new jazz record, from a new jazz band. [Ahmed] make music about the music of Ahmed Abdul-Malik. They excavate, re-inhabit and use a-new the now overlooked documents, and fragmentary plans, of his mid-20th century synthetic vision to produce a new jazz imagination for the 21st century. Ahmed-Malik (1927-1993) was a NYC bassist, oudist, composer, educator and philosopher. A potent(ial) influence on Coltrane and Monk (we imagine), he was also a significant composer in his own right. (Ignored into creative obscurity, he spent his final decades teaching, and performing seldom). His albums Jazz Sahara (1958) and East Meets West (1960) fuse aspects of Arabic and East African musics and thought, his committed long-term relationship with Sufi Islam, and then-modern jazz and thinking – in revolutionary and vital ways. The product is exciting, radical, raw, and beautiful. But, as well as honouring these traditions, Abdul-Malik invented and imagined a lot*. Abdul- Malik’s straddling, synthetic and inclusive vision is one of the great projects of the imagination in jazz. He mixed sounds and ethics, meanings and beliefs in open, experimental ways without dogma. And so do [Ahmed]. They visit and (re)think his compositions and the process potential in them. They play the notes, but use them, and the ideas in and about them, as vehicles for their unique imaginations, instrumental approaches and ideas. Through his compositions they re-imagine and re-synthesize, moving from what they know into newly creative space. They imagine themselves into the future, free of the dogma, clichés and cloy neo-classicisms of current ‘improvised music’ and ‘free jazz’. * Kelley, R.D.G. (2012) ‘Ahmed Abdul-Malik’s Islamic Experimentalism’ in Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times. Cambridge: Harvard University Press: 91-119 talks about this in his brief but fascinating study.

Incredibly pleased to finally release this from the archives! Kumio Kurachi is truly one of the most original figures in Japanese music, and his music exists within its very own colourful world. Recorded across two nights way back in 2009, Kurachi is joined by Taku Unami and London improvisors Steve Beresford and Angharad Davies. These two shows still remain as Kurachi's only concerts outside Japan. "Kumio Kurachi depicts our mind and feelings with unthinkable and bizarre words which can be embarrassing to listen to. And yet he manages to create a world which is so familiar to us - small events of our everyday life that we don't pay much attention to. Whether it is a conversation between a funeral service conductor and his helper that you overheard in a supermarket (Supermarket Chitose), or about the people affected by a dam construction (A Dam with 30,000,000 Teardrops), his songs are fragments of our human behaviours and experiences. His lyrical world is made even more unpredictable by his unique guitar style which is apparently inspired by the koto. The music is so melodious that the mixture of the strange wording, guitar and variations of voices thrives all together and it can haunt you without noticing it, just like the small events of everyday life you can't escape from." - Midori Ogata --- Kumio Kurachi / guitar Taku Unami / guitar Angharad Davies / violin Steve Beresford / piano --- Tracklisting: 1. Train Song (poetry reading)2. Instrumental l3. Asahi4. Cling Film (Saran Wrap)5. Full of Miso (Miso Ga Ippai)6. Instrumental ll7. A Dam with 30,000,000 teardrops (30,000,000 Tsubu Dam)8. Best Camera9. An Event On An Island (Tsudoe Nokonoshima) ft Unami, Beresford10. Slow Walker (Yukkuri Aruku Hito) ft Unami, Beresford11. Supermarket Chitose ft Unami, Beresford12. Here Comes Tatamiya (Tatamiya Ga Kita) ft Unami, Beresford, Davies13. Steel Tower (Tettou) ft Unami, Beresford, Davies14. Soshu Yakyoku (蘇州夜曲) <cover> written in 1940. Lyrics by Yaso Saijo (西條八十) Music by Ryoichi Hattori (服部良一)15. Blues of Blue Natchan (Natchan Blue) --- Mastered by James Dunn from the original recording made by Pete Coward - thanks Pete! Artwork by Kurachi & Oli Barratt. Massive thanks to Midori Ogata, without whom this wouldn't have happened.

High quality screenprinted on deluxe thick paper printed by Design Club Dalston. Design by Maja Larrson  Limited to 100 numbered copies  The Necks are one of the most distinctive and enthralling groups in music. Ever a pleasure to witness their mesmerically symbiotic musical interplay and we're delighted to welcome them back following their 30th anniversary last year! The hard-earned, almost telepathic rapport that Chris Abrahams, Lloyd Swanton and Tony Buck have developed over the past three decades is truly one of the most compelling in live music and it's a privilege to have them back here at OTO.“among the world’s greatest forces in music...” – LA Times“One of the most extraordinary groups on the planet... a sonic experience that has few parallels or rivals.” – The GuardianTHE NECKSThe Necks offer a phenomenal musical experience, unlike any piano trio you may have heard. Masters of their own musical language of long-form improvisation, each night they step onto the stage with no pre-conceived ideas of what they will play – they and the audience will go on a sonic journey that is created in the moment and in that room.Over their 30 years together, they honed an assured process of building around repeated motifs through subtle shifts and layering, to produce an extraordinarily dense and hypnotic effect which builds in a mesmerising, epic fashion …. a trio conjuring an orchestral expanse. Every Necks' performance is a singular event, 2 sets of approximately 45 minutes, entirely improvised and working with the acoustics of the room.