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Leo Records

"Poco a Poco, the first Ganelin CD released by Leo back in 1988, was reissued late last year in a limited edition of 500 copies. If you missed it the first time around, don’t make the same mistake twice; this is not only one of the group’s finest documents, but one of the most distinctive visions of post-’60s avant-garde jazz available. The disc presents a concert recorded in Novosibirsk in February 1978. The recording quality, as might be expected, is brittle and thin; these are, after all, “officially” unauthorized recordings. Still, it takes little effort to get used to the sound, and the quality of the performance far outweighs such a caveat.Ganelin’s music does not prove so very foreign to those with an affinity for the A.A.C.M., especially in its members’ multi-instrumentalism and theatricality, and the Dutch avant-garde, with which the Trio shares a particularly European brand of whimsy and an informed thumbing of the nose at tradition. Tarasov’s barreling drum assaults are reminiscent of Han Bennink’s similar outbursts, but, like Bennink, Tarasov is capable of delicacy and can also swing mightily. Ganelin conflates stride, boogie, modern classical pianism and post-Taylor tumult into an impressive arsenal perfectly suited to the band’s compression of decades of jazz history-and on occasion, native folk music-into the span of a show or even a single piece. And Chekasin, inscrutable and often seemingly detached, mines a vein not far removed from Roland Kirk or the Art Ensemble’s reedmen Poco a Poco captures a vivid suite (the pieces are titled “Poco 1” through “Poco 11”) that displays the band at its best, and if the element of visual theatricality is absent, it is scarcely missed. - Steve Smith" "The Ganelin Trio in live performance must have been an impossibly seductive occasion. Most jazz life in the former Soviet Union centred around festivals which no doubt provided the usual opportunities for predictable caravans of musicians to practise their scales. The most important was the Autumn Rhythms Festival in Leningrad (present day St. Petersburg) where no band was invited to play two years in a row. The exception to the rule was always the Ganelin Trio. They played every year." - Steve Kulak "Maybe not since the first Ornette Coleman records appeared has Western European jazz experienced quite such a shock of the totally unexpected as the Ganelin Trio produced." - The Wire --- Vladimir Tarasov / drums, percussionVyacheslav Ganelin / piano, keyboards, dulcimer, guitarVladimir Chekasin / reeds, flute, ocarina, voice --- Recorded live in Novosibirsk, February 1978. Remastered by Alan Mosley

The Ganelin Trio – Poco-a-Poco

After a successful tour supporting The Hour of the Star, the group's remarkable 2011 debut for Leo Records, Perelman decided to explore his relationship with each member of the unit in more intimate settings. Having worked with Matt Shipp and Gerald Cleaver on Family Ties (LR 630) Ivo Perelman continues to explore his relationship with each member of his quartet in a slightly different setting.  "This is more free than the previous album; yes, I agree with that. I think because Matthew is such a wonderful musician, and he has this antenna; and because Gerald can go any way the music goes...Since the piano is a harmonic instrument you would think it would limit the choices, but with Matthew it does not. And when I do venture out of tonal Western music, into noises and microtones, this doesn't scare him; he takes it as an opportunity to expand the music." - Ivo Perelman "The Foreign Legion is Perelman's eighth record named in honor of one of Clarice Lispector's novels. Emboldened by the stellar contributions of his empathetic sidemen, the leader's cathartic performances transpose the Brazilian author's emotionally charged narratives into pure sonic expression, continuing his fertile exploration of a vibrant new tradition." All About Jazz --- Ivo Perelman / tenor sax Matt Shipp / piano Gerald Cleaver / drums --- Recorded, mixed and mastered at Park West studios, Brooklyn, NY, December 2011.

Perelman / Shipp / Cleaver – The Foreign Legion

Taylor reads his poetry on the subject of composition, accompanied by small percussion.  "What kind of writing Is Chinampas? Cecil presents no graphic system - if Chinampas is writing, it is so in the absence of visuality. Under what conditions, then, could Chinampas be called "writing"? Perhaps within an understanding of writing more broadly conceived as nonverbal, as well as verbal, systems of graphic communication. Yet, since what we have there is nongraphic verbalcommunication, the legitimacy of its claim to writing is not self-evident. Nevertheless ideas of and about graphic systems are presented in Chinampas, sound blurrring vision in the improvisation of another writing; and image, position, and direction are so encoded- the visual-spatial so embedded -in the poem that what we have is something more complex even than some newly included Outside of writing. Rather, Chinampas is out from the outside of writing as it is conventionally defined or redefined in what have become conventional redefinitions. Writing is, in Chinampas, a visual-spatial-tactile improvisation of system that activates the aural resources of the language. The poem is an improvisation of writing not to be appropriated by, not proper to, an older and somehow more inclusive graphesis: it is not a valorization but an improvisation of the nonverbal; not an abandonment but a (re)sounding of the visual-spatial." - Fred Moton Great essay by Moten on this piece here. --- Cecil Taylor / poetry, voice, tympany, bells, small percussion --- Recorded at Doodlehums Studio, London 16th & 17th November 1987 by Alan Mosley. Artwork by Lora Denis. Original painting by Malik Cisse.

Cecil Taylor – Chinampas

"It is as though I've known, seen, heard Steve forever with his groups, projects, and his music! It is an honour for me to see this recording released. Steve loved this duo! Improvising with Steve was always an adventure. The music was simply there, immediate, full of play and emotioins, surprises, joy, and paradoxically, full of control and freedom! "Just make music and follow it," - as Steve said so well. I would like to dedecate this to Irene Aebi, his lifelong companion and beautiful musician. Hey Steve, so long, we miss you so much!" - Joëlle Léandre  "This recording documents a live meeting of two of the strongest and most radically different improvisers in the world. The pairing of the convolutedly logical and ironic Lacy and the aggressive and passionate Leandre stands as one of the best examples of the ability of conscientious artists to meet and create great music. Check the first track where Lacy’s restrained yet harmonically probing architecture joins in a stately waltz with a neo-classical bowed response from Leandre. Track two features water buffalo groans and African wood trumpet sounds from a decidedly atypical Lacy, which seems to spark the musical equivalent of raised eyebrows and laughter from Leandre. Track three starts with Lacy chanting "one more time” with Leandre joining in a extemporaneous rant in French before they get to their instruments in a seamless finale. Track four is the most poignant of all; it’s a minute long phone message from Steve Lacy in French expressing his joy at the performance and his affection for Leandre (he passed away two years later fromliver cancer). This last track, for me, makes this CD a beautiful and touching tribute to one of the icons of music, the Satie of Jazz, Steve Lacy." - Nilnan Perera --- Steve Lacy / saxophone Joëlle Léandre / double bass --- Recorded live at Cafe Belga, 28th July 2002. This concert was part of Lacy's farewell tour of Europe before he went back to the USA in 2002. The concert was organised by Cedric D'hondt/ Champauditif. Recorded and mastered at Odeon Mobile Unit studio. The last track is a phone message left on Léandre's answering machine by Lacy, expressing his wish for this performance to be released.

Steve Lacy And Joëlle Léandre – One More TIme

This is some mysterious, cosmic, brooding music like nothing you've heard before. Wadada Leo Smith plays his great trumpet, Walter Quintus - computer & processing, Katya Quintus - voice, Miroslav Tadic - classical & baritone guitar, and Mark Nauseef - percussion & live electronics Of all the avant-garde players from his generation, Wadada Leo Smith easily ranks among the most insightful collaborators with electronic musicians. His willingness to include electrified lexicon in his musical language now yields Snakish, a surprising soundscape created with a band culled from the Cal/Arts faculty, including guitarist Miroslav Tadic and electrician Walter Quintus, as well as vocliast Katya Quintus and Mark Nauseef on percussion and electronics. The guitar, trumpet, and percussion juxtapose the electronic environments to create rainbows of color and textures, leading down surprising avenues of 21st Century music. As with much of Smith's work, space and silence share in importance with sounds generated. The fourteen concise aural haiku begin with the dreamy "Uncoiling, which features Smith muted and musing with Tadic's understated guitar in a shimmering soundscape. Quintus quietly recites (in German?) as sparks rise. Nauseef's bell awakens "Cosmoil, Tadic runs muted strings through electro mist and processed Smith flares. The short atmospheric "Disembodyism gives way to "Over the Influence, with its ghostly train sounds and Smith's pointed declarations. "Yopo also begins with a bell, and Smith plays carefully chosen notes over the frothy hum around him. Black Bell Mother utilizes many bells and gongs; Tadic contributes muted sound from a his prepared guitar. Tadic and Smith quietly converse on "Majounish, while "Kawami Wama sounds cinematic behind the recitation. Jagged electronics scrape Smith's blunted horn then overgrow the garden. A sputtering electro raspberry introduces Tadic's guitar on "Speeds Per Coil, Smith's warm sparse phrases a safe place in roaring whoosh. Smith bites into low gritty growly notes on "Neither Liquid Nor Gaseous, Torn among singing bowls, undermixed prepared guitar, and vining cloudy sound. Opening with sounds like a Martian gamelan, "Green Gold Melt grows spidery with slide guitar and Smith's smoky long tones curling upward. The solo electronic satellite song "Gangah Wallah leads into the moody "Rivers of Swans. Sweet small prepared guitar chords join Smith's muted playing over shifting tectonic plates. A searching trumpet and prepared guitar poke through the kilowatt wind on "Coiling. With Quintus' ambient sounds crackling and rushing around them, Wadada Leo Smith and the Snakish band have tapped into the music of wonder. --- Walter Quintus / computer, effectMiroslav Tadic / guitarMark Nauseef / percussion, electronicsWadada Leo Smith / trumpet Katya Quintus / voice --- Recorded during 2003 and 2004 in Zerkall and in Los Angeles by Miriam Kolar and Walter Quintus. Mixed and mastered by Walter Quintus

Smith / Quintus / Quintus / Taduc / Nauseef – Snakish