26–27 February 2018, OTO Project Space

OTO PROJECT SPACE: lll人 (Daichi Yoshikawa / Paul Abbott / Seymour Wright)

Doors 7.30pm
Performance 8—10pm
Facebook Event

Strange, intense and extreme lll人 (pronounced /el/) is the trio of Daichi Yoshikawa (feedback, objects), Paul Abbott (real and imaginary drums) and Seymour Wright (actual and potential saxophone). Together they have developed extraordinary sounds, and a complex, significant body of work since emerging in 2012 from the sweat-haze of regular subterranean London meets. With no obvious comparisons, the trio is still finding, twisting and hammering out an expanding musical universe balanced only by its own logics. lll人 grow and slice open growths of future sound, testing extremes, and perfectly reasonable. The tools are familiar, the listening is not.

Having together learnt lll人 music through knotted London languages, these events find the trio revisiting Hackney currents through a sonic, affective transformation of the rude architecture of the Cafe Oto Project Space.

The trio will perform for 2 hours each night. This will be a rare, and raw exploration. 

Recent records include 'vjerhanxsk' and 'gjērhan'.
https://www.cafeoto.co.uk/artists/llln/

Seymour Wright
https://www.cafeoto.co.uk/artists/seymour-wright/
www.seymourwright.com
Seymour Wright – saxophonist, investigator, artist – lives in London. His practice is about the saxophone – music, history and technique ­– actual and potential; an on-going, rigorous and exhaustive exploration of the instrument. 

Paul Abbott
https://www.cafeoto.co.uk/artists/paul-abbott/
www.paulabbott.net
Paul Abbott is an artist and musician based in London, working through questions and feelings connecting music and language: using real and imaginary drums, synthetic sounds, performance and writing.

Daichi Yoshikawa
https://www.cafeoto.co.uk/artists/daichi-yoshikawa/
http://jesusinacat.org/
Daichi Yoshikawa is a Japanese sound artist based in London and Berlin. A former participant of workshops organised by AMM co-founder Eddie Prevost and sound artist David Toop, Yoshikawa's distinct sound comes from feedback systems generated between homemade assemblages of speakers, contact microphones, and various found objects.