Daniel Blumberg with Ute Kanngiesser, Billy Steiger & Tom Wheatley - 28.2.18

All members of the OTO family in their own right, the group casts Blumberg’s songs as through-ideas to weave four threads around. New material from their forthcoming album Minus - out 4th May on Mute Records - heard for the first time here.

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Daniel Blumberg / steinberger guitar, piano, harmonica, voice
Ute Kanngiesser / cello
Tom Wheatley / double bass
Billy Steiger / violin

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Recorded live at Cafe OTO by Shaun Crook on Wednesday 28th February 2018. Mixed and Mastered by Marta Salogni. Drawing by Daniel Blumberg. All songs written by Daniel Blumberg and published by Mute Song Ltd.  

Available as 320k MP3 or 24bit FLAC 

Tracklisting:

1. Madder
2. Minus
3. The Fuse
4. Family
5. Off & On
6. Stacked
7. The Bomb

Daniel Blumberg

Daniel Blumberg is an artist and musician from London. Over the past decade he has released an extensive catalogue of music under different names, while forging ongoing collaborations with musicians, writers and filmmakers such as Neil Hagerty, David Toop and Brady Corbet. He is a prolific visual artist, described by Hans Ulrich Obrist as “one of London's most exciting emerging new artists”. Most recently Blumberg has been playing and recording at London's Cafe Oto, working intensively with a core group of improvisers consisting of violinist Billy Steiger, saxophonist Seymour Wright, double bassist Tom Wheatley and cellist Ute Kanngiesser. These regular sessions have culminated in the release of his debut eponymous record Minus on Mute Records (May 2018), accompanied by a companion LP of solos by the key players on the record including Dirty Three's Jim White. Alongside this OTORoku have released a live recording of the group and two discs by GUO, Blumberg's duo with Seymour Wright. Minus is a powerful and highly personal work, one that weds a free-music ethos to the rawest emotional songwriting. Live the material is radically reimagined from show to show, with a rotating cast of players pushing Blumberg's fragile songforms to their limits.

boiledegg.org

Billy Steiger

Billy Steiger was born in Howth on the 16th December, 1986. Now he plays the violin.

“Then he sat down by a pond and began to play a tune. As he played, the most extraordinary thing happened. One by one the fish in the pond began to jump out and fly about in the air. And what is more, they were all different colours and they were singing to the music.”

Patrick, Quentin Blake.

https://billysteiger.bandcamp.com/

Ute Kanngiesser

Ute Kanngiesser is a London based in musician from Germany. She has played classical cello since early childhood and turned to improvisation and experimental music while training in physical theatre and dance in Berlin. Since then, she has radically deconstructed her classical roots and focussed on the immediate material of her instrument - its limitless resonance and pulse, its potential for an elemental music that dissolves conventional notions of rhythm and pitch and what it means to be lyrical. Along this journey she has worked with some of the most influential players of free music and experimental composition, as well as artist film makers, writers and architects.

Most recent collaborations have been with John Tilbury, Seymour Wright, Paul Abbott, Billy Steiger, Angharad Davies, Steve Noble, Crystabel Riley, Rie Nakajima, Daniel Blumberg, Jim White, Eddie Prevost, John Butcher, Evie Ward, Tom Wheatley, Jennifer Allum, Marjolaine Charbin, Dimitra Lazaridou Chatzigoga, Keiko Yamamoto, Phil Minton, Pak Yan Lau, Assemble, and Keira Greene.

Her music has been released on Otoroku, Matchless, Earshots, Another Timbre and Mute. www.utekanngiesser.com

Words about Ute Kanngiesser's solo release Geäder (Earshots):

"Automatic writing almost, or a fugue state. Arriving at an end point is an exhaustion, almost like waking from a dream. You look back at what has been created with bafflement. Footprints on a beach you can’t remember. You marvel: what have I done?" – We Need No Swords

"[...] environmental sounds captured in Hackney as a spur for improvisation; nasal bowing sounds, percussive fanfares, unspooling loops of harmonics that crack upon impact – whole sides to the cello normally shut down by conventional technique." - The Guardian