Books and Magazines

A Quarterly Journal of Post-Rock Cultural Pluralism, edited by Byron Coley. Issue no. 4. In this issue: Alex Behr: Junior High Reviews; Tosh Berman: Tom Phillips IRMA the Opera; Alan Bishop: Pink Floyd Animals: Trevor Block: Rowdy Roddy Piper; Karla Borecky: Antonin Artaud: Pour en finir avec le jugement de dieu; Bree: Kōbō Abe Woman of the Dunes; Benoit Chaput: Plume Latraverse; Sharon Cheslow: Stand-up Comedy; Byron Coley: Column; Karen Constance: Igor Wakhevitch Hathor; Nigel Cross: Jeff Cloves; Chris D: Humanity of Femme Fatales; Georganne Deen: Chinatown L.A. + Cathy Ward; Lili Dwight: Farscape; Erika Elizabeth: Mark Sten All Ages; Ray Farrell: Charles Bukowski; Andrea Feldman: Mix Tape Memories; Eddie Flowers: Review Column; Scott Foust: Jewel Robbery; Tom Givan: Matthew Stokoe; David Greenberger: Danny Kaye; Tom Greenwood: Quiet Music Festival; Mats Gustafsson: Sperm/Samsa Trio; Michael Layne Heath: Andrew Matheson Sick on You; Tim Hinely: George Foster's 1977 Season; Michael Hurley: Jackpine Jamboree; Lisa Marie Jarlborn: Bob Dylan 'Sad Eyed Lady'; Danielle Jelley-Rettman: Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market; Ira Kaplan: Steve Miller Band; Maria Kozic: Curing a Migraine with Two Movies; Matt Krefting: Ndegeocello/Sawyer/Krimsky Trio; Tom Lax: Review Column + reviews; Heather Leigh: Hot Gossip; Ted Lee: Illustrations; Donna Lethal: YouTube Reviews; Alan Licht: Peter Stampfel live; Owen Maercks: How I Listen; Marc Masters: Bromp Treb Stickless; Hisham Mayet: Tommy Jay Tall Tales of Trauma; Phil McMullen: The Amazing Picture You; Richard Meltzer: Better; Phil Milstein: Bull Tongue 1-3; Nick Mitchell: Nine Invisibles Pureheadspace; Thurston Moore: Column; Bill Nace: Farscape; Dylan Nyoukis: Red Brut Rebirth; Gary Panter: Funny Animals Portfolio; Brigid Pearson: Avocado; Charles Plymell: Deborah Davis The Trip; Tony Rettman: Rode Grey; Joanne Robertson: Sean Nicholas Savage Other Death; Bruce Russell: Second Hand Records; Suzy Rust: Book Signing for Thelma Blumberg + Woolaroc; Savage Pencil: Cameron Jamie; Andy Schwartz: Mark Ribowsky Dreams to Remember; John Sinclair: The Way You Look Tonight; Leah Singer: Gary Panter interview; Orchid Spangiafora: Allen Ravenstine Pharoah's Bee; Chris Stigliano: Mother #2 & 3; Brian Turner: Liimanarina + Ornerys; Gregg Turner: The Present; Tesco Vee: Collecting & the Voices Within; Valerie Webber: Your Ideal Love Mate; Tara Young: Mötley Crüe live.

BULL TONGUE REVIEW No. 4 MAG

out of stock

What is experimental music today? This book offers an up to date survey of this field for anyone with an interest, from seasoned practitioners to curious readers. This book takes the stance that experimental music is not a limited historical event, but is a proliferation of approaches to sound that reveals much about present-day experience. An experimental work is not identifiable by its sound alone, but by the nature of the questions it poses and its openness to the sounding event. Experimentation is a way of working. It pushes past that which is known to discover what lies beyond it, finding new knowledge, forms, and relationships, or accepting a state of uncertainty. For each of these composers and sound artists, craft is developed and transformed in response to the questions they bring to their work. Scientific, perceptual, or social phenomena become catalysts in the operation of the work. These practices are not presented according to a chronology, a set of techniques, or social groupings. Instead, they are organized according to the content areas that are their subjects, including resonance, harmony, objects, shapes, perception, language, interaction, sites, and histories. Musical materials may be subject, among other treatments, to systemization, observation, examination, magnification, fragmentation, translation, or destabilization. These restless and exploratory modes of engagement have continued to develop over recent decades, expanding the scope of both musical practice and listening Review We have needed a reformulation of what experimental music now means, i.e., what has become since Michael Nyman took stock of it in 1974and this book beautifully fulfills that requirement. Jennie Gottschalk takes a fresh and independent look at experimental music of the last forty years, finding both points of continuation from the previous era and many novel and heartening developments. It is also an adventure story with surprising twists and a panoramic cast of characters, like a novel in which works and ideas are the central figures, seemingly with a collective life of their own. --Michael Pisaro, Composer and Faculty Member, Composition and Experimental Sound Practices, California Institute of the Arts, USAReading Experimental Music Since 1970 it is impossible not to be dazzled first by the range and imagination of experimental music and sound art that is being made today, and second by the way in which Jennie Gottschalk has described and catalogued so much of it, so lucidly. Impeccably and authoritatively researched, by a writer who is both a practitioner and an astute observer, it deserves to be the go-to reference for years to come. --Tim Rutherford-Johnson, author of 'Music After The Fall: Modern Composition and Culture Since 1989', UKThis book is a unique achievement. Without catering to current fashions or well-worn academic assumptions, it transcends the limits of both journalism and traditional musicology to be both comprehensive and insightful. Reading it has helped me to ask new questions about a history that I thought I knew quite well. --David Dunn, Assistant Professor of Music, University of California Santa Cruz, USA About the Author Jennie Gottschalk (born 1978 in Stanford, CA) is a composer based in Boston. She holds a bachelor's degree in composition from The Boston Conservatory (2001), and a masters degree and doctorate from Northwestern University (2008). Teachers have included Larry Bell, Yakov Gubanov, Jay Alan Yim, Augusta Read Thomas, and Aaron Cassidy. Recent performances in Los Angeles (Dog Star Orchestra) and Chicago (Northwestern University Symphony Orchestra and Contemporary Music Ensemble). Her dissertation and current work explore connections between American pragmatist thought and experimental music. Current projects include a string quartet, a childrens book, an experimental music blog (soundexpanse.com), and a residency at the Conway School of Landscape Design. For additional resources related to this book, please visit the authors website at soundexpanse.com.

Jennie Gottschalk - Experimental Music Since 1970 Book

out of stock

Originally published in France in 2002, Jacqueline Caux’s Presque Rien avec Luc Ferrari is the first book to offer a comprehensive and insightful look into the work and career of one the most pioneering music composers of the second half of the 20th century. Errant Bodies Press is pleased to release the English edition translated by Jérôme Hansen.  True to the genre-defying career of Luc Ferrari, who passed away in 2005 at the age of 76, the book skilfully assembles original interviews conducted by the author with previously unpublished texts in which the composer reflects on some of his key works. The interviews are also interspersed with fourteen short "imaginary autobiographies", written from 1971 to 1997, and ranging from semi-factual accounts to more poetic, fictional, or even science-fictional pieces.  In her illuminating introduction, Jacqueline Caux starts by recounting some of the main achievements of this most libertarian, anti-dogmatic of artists, before identifying three constants throughout Ferrari’s tumultuous career: his passionate attention to the sounds of everyday life, his compositional use of chance and his emphasis on themes of intimacy and sensuality. In the first and more substantial chapter (History), musicologist François Delalande, composer Daniel Terrugi and musicologist Evelyne Gayou join the author to take Ferrari through his musical life, starting with his early years studying piano at the Conservatoire de Paris, where his teachers included Arthur Honegger and Olivier Messiaen. Tracing back his first encounter with fellow musique concrète pioneers Pierre Schaeffer and Pierre Henry, with which he would found the influential Groupe de Recherche Musicale (GRM), Ferrari offers a personal and richly evocative account of one of the most effervescent periods in modern music, culminating in the 1958 Brussels World’s Fair and the official recognition of a new generation of experimental composers: Varèse, Cage, Xenakis, Stockhausen. Another major shift in his career occurs with his discovery of the use of unprocessed everyday sounds, leading to what is perhaps his most famous work, Presque Rien (1969). This compositional strategy, for which he coined the characteristically understated term "anecdotal music", allowed him to bring the social into the musical vocabulary – a radical artistic move appropriate for these politically radical times. Chapter Two to Five successively address Ferrari’s involvement in a variety of mediums, from instrumental composition and music theater, to radio art and even installation art. In the final chapter (Concepts), Jacqueline Caux asks the composer to elaborate on some of the key concepts that have guided his work: anecdotal, autobiography, chance, heterogeneity, heterozygote, freedom, narration, tautology, etc. The book concludes with the complete list of his works as well as discography.

Luc Ferrari - Almost Nothing with Luc Ferrari

out of stock