Wednesday 16 October 2019, 7.30pm

Somersaults (Tobias Delius / Olie Brice / Mark Sanders) + Alexander Hawkins (solo)

Somersaults is the improvising trio of Olie Brice (double bass), Tobias Delius (tenor & clarinet) and Mark Sanders (drums). They play exciting, playful free jazz ranging from driving loose swing and tumbling polyphony to abstract noise and textural exploration. Between them they have played with a who’s who of free improv and creative jazz. Tobias is a member of legendary Dutch big band the ICP, and Mark and Olie have been heard together with musicians including Paul Dunmall, Evan Parker, Ken Vandermark, Mikolaj Trzaska, Rachel Musson, Steve Swell & Ingrid Laubrock. The first Somersaults album was released in 2015 on the Two Rivers label, and the 2nd will be following in September 2019 on West Hill Records.

“This is European free improv at its best -****½“- The Free Jazz Blog

“a unique and rewarding listen” – Clifford Allen, New York City Jazz Record

“They still maintain their jazz roots in terms of language and roles, but stretch them as far as possible without breaking the mould – ****” – All About Jazz

Mark Sanders

Mark has worked with a host of renowned musicians including Derek Bailey, Henry Grimes, Mathew Shipp, Evan Parker, Roswell Rudd, in duo and quartets with Wadada Leo Smith and trios with Charles Gayle with Sirone and William Parker.

In situations using composition Mark works in a number of projects including Christian Marclay’s Everyday for film and live music and John Butcher’s Tarab Cuts - both projects have performed major festivals throughout Europe and Brazil. He has performed works by guitarist John Coxon in Glasgow and Sydney playing with the Scottish and Sydney Symphony Orchestras. With New York’s ICE Ensemble he has performed John Zorn’s The Tempest in London and at Huddersfield New Music Festival.

Mark also works in the groups of Paul Dunmall including Deep Whole Trio with Paul Rogers, and the ensembles of Sarah Gail Brand, including a long-standing duo. He has a lengthy discography including a solo album, has performed internationally and played at major festivals including, Nickelsdorf, Ulrichsburg, Womad and notably at Glastonbury with legendary saxophonist John Tchicai.

"ubiquitous, diverse and constantly creative, drummer Mark Sanders always outdoes himself, whether playing with restraint or erupting like a dynamo." Bruce L Gallenter, Downtown Music Gallery. NY

Olie Brice

Olie Brice is an improvising double bassist from London. He leads two bands - a quintet that plays his original compositions and a freely improvising trio featuring Tobias Delius and Mark Sanders. He has also worked with musicians including Paul Dunmall, Tony Malaby, Steve Swell, Achim Kaufmann, Alex Ward and Ingrid Laubrock.

“Brice makes the entire body of his bass sing. He has the ability to deliver a fractal line that is as purposeful as any by the great jazz bassists, but to do so within an entirely abstract setting” - Brian Morton, Point of Departure

Tobias Delius

“Delius’s mastery of the tenor is sprawling, but the deep, warm richness of his tone is a constant, recalling the breathy sensuality of Ben Webster, the agile gravity of Sonny Rollins, and the pinched phrasing of Archie Shepp …” – Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader.

Tobias Delius was born on 15 July 1964 in Oxford, England. He began playing saxophone in 1980 in the German Ruhr region. In 1983/84 he lived in Mexico City where he played in the “Cuarteto Mexicano de Jazz” led by pianist Francixco Téllez.

Delius moved to Amsterdam in 1984 and studied for a short while at the Sweelinck Conservatorium. He quickly became involved with Amsterdam improvisers and dropped his studies to immerse himself in the improvised music scene. In 1990 he was awarded the Podiumprijs from the organisation Stichting Jazz in Nederland. He has worked in Europe and overseas with such musicians as Steve Lacy (October Meeting ’91), Louis Moholo’s Viva-la-black (South Africa ’93), Bill Frisell, Mark Feldman and Trio Clusone (Clusone Jazz ’93), Misha Mengelberg (“Pollo de Mare”, Angelica ’96 in Bologna), Steve Beresford (“Signals for Tea”, Vancouver ’98), Jeb Bishop, Kent Kessler, Hamid Drake (Chicago 2001) and Ray Anderson (Rotterdam, ’01).

Tibias is currently based in Berlin where ihe is an active member of the improvised community performing regularly with Axel Dörner, Christian Lillinger, Clayton Thomas, Liz Albee and many others.

Alexander Hawkins

Alexander Hawkins is musician who is ‘unlike anything else in modern creative music’ (Ni Kantu) and whose recent work has reached a ‘dazzling new apex’ (Downbeat).

As a pianist, he has been described as ‘remarkable...possessing staggering technical ability and a fecund imagination as both player and composer.’ Concerning his organ playing, critic Brian Morton recently commented that ‘[t]he most interesting Hammond player of the last decade and more, [Hawkins] has already extended what can be done on the instrument.’

His writing has been said to represent ‘a fundamental reassertion of composition within improvised music’ (Point of Departure), and his voice one of the ‘most vividly distinctive...in modern jazz’ (The Jazzmann).

An in-demand collaborator as well as soloist, composer, and bandleader, Hawkins continues to be heard live and on record with vast array of contemporary leaders of all generations, including the likes of Evan Parker, John Surman, Joe McPhee, Mulatu Astatke, Wadada Leo Smith, Anthony Braxton, Marshall Allen, Han Bennink, Hamid Drake, Rob Mazurek, Taylor Ho Bynum, Harris Eisenstadt, Matana Roberts, and Shabaka Hutchings, amongst many others. He has also been noted for a number of years for his performances in the bands of legendary South African drummer, Louis Moholo-Moholo.

Concert appearances have taken him to major club, concert and festival stages worldwide.

“…Hawkins is a really vital link in a long historical chain, and his ability to sculpt his own language from a deeply rooted creative bedrock is compelling” - Jazzwise

“Sounds like all the future jazz you might imagine without ever being able to conceive of the details” - The Guardian